Tag Archives: Jessie Wiseman

The Blog of Big Ideas’ 1st Annual Vanguard Awards

Following my previous post in which I summarized my thoughts about film in 2011, I think it would be interesting to continue the so-called “Vanguard Award” idea and expand it to include categories that are handed out in the Academy Awards.

The Vanguard Awards will be handed out by The Blog of Big Ideas to films, actors, and film makers that advanced cinema with their artistic vision and dexterity, helping to construct some of the most interesting pieces of art of the last year. It will be an annual award handed out on the same day as the Oscars. In subsequent posts of this coming year, I will be nominating films that I think should be given consideration until it all comes to a close with the awards themselves.

The Vanguard Award will be given to films of artistic relevance, where there are aspects that are unique, original and that may even be considered ahead of its time. This is not to say that the recognition I give to these films necessarily means that these are the films I thought were the best, just the most thought-provoking.

♦ Vanguard Film ♦

Nominees:

Drive (Nicholas Winding Refn)

Melancholia (Lars Von Trier)

The Tree of Life (Terrence Malick)

Take Shelter (Jeff Nichols)

Bellflower (Evan Glodell)

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Film review: Bellflower (2011)

Director: Evan Glodell

Cast: Evan Glodell (Woodrow), Jessie Wiseman (Milly), Tyler Dawson (Aiden), Rebekah Brandes (Courtney)

Bellflower is a modest, art-house wild ride of a film that is written and directed by Evan Glodell, who also brings his talent to the fore leading a group of compelling actors that inhabit a world awash in sunlight, where only certain colors, like blood red, pop out of the screen.

Glodell plays Woodrow, a seemingly unemployed handyman who plans to build a flamethrower and other weapons of mass destruction in the best Mad Max fashion, alongside his equally resourceful best friend Aiden. (Tyler Dawson). Together they pal around, drinking, bar hopping, always looking for the next girl as they await the moment in which their projects come to fruition. While Aiden is a free-spirit, Woodrow just goes with the flow, open to finding the sort of companionship his loneliness craves for.

Continue reading Film review: Bellflower (2011)